Category

Movement

Kettlebell Functional Training

By | Movement

By Jodi Barrett

We all want to move pain free in our daily lives, though we often forget that the best way to accomplish this is training through functional movement. Training functional movements is to apply basic training of movements that mimic day-to-day living that allows your body to work efficiently as one unit. We do not walk without using our upper body or only rotate on one singular plane the whole day, so we should not train that way to be functionally efficient. Using compound exercises allows you to train multi-movements and muscles on different planes which will allow you to increase balance, strength, mobility, and body awareness that will undoubtedly help you avoid unnecessary injuries. An example may be if you are putting away groceries in a high cabinet and you do not have the strength or mobility to complete this task without pain or you are unable to complete the task at all. Implementing my favorite training tool, the kettlebell (KB), we can train an overhead press to work on the strength. As you progress, we would implement rotation with the press to mimic an individual putting their groceries up in a high corner cabinet, possibly twisting as they reach.

We look at functional movements such as getting up and down from the floor or simply getting out of bed in the morning. There is an exercise that we use in our training program that basically enlightens clients and opens their eyes and minds to functional training. The exercise is to get up and down off the floor alternating from your stomach and then on to your back. The exercise sounds simple, but after 60 seconds people become very aware of how challenging this may be.

Whether or not training has been a part of your life, movement is definitely a part of your life. We all move. We walk, jump, crawl, twist, and enjoy what our bodies are capable of. When we sit for long periods of time and become tired in our daily lives, we often forget that our bodies were created to move! I believe functional training has become much more important because our lives are more sedentary than our parents’ and our grandparents’ lives were. Even to this day, looking back at how active my parents were compared to people today is quite different. In school settings, by the time our children reach high school, they no longer have mandatory physical activity classes. Thus, the importance or awareness, above all, is that we need to take action to train our bodies functionally! Since longevity is often overlooked in trendy, high intensity routines, it is important to circle your training back to what matters most—building, strengthening, and preserving the body – not breaking it down. By following this guideline, we can maintain a healthy, physically abled body.

Kettlebells for Functional Movement

When training with the KB, the first thing people need to understand is that you must “link your body” together into one strong chain of action. This principle ensures that you will not be placing any stress or pressure on any single joint or muscle, which goes back to our definition of exercise – injury prevention and performance enhancement. Additionally, it will secure the total-body principles kettlebells are built on: linking your body by applying proper form, engaging alignment and center of gravity, and executing each move with a flow of motion.

Let’s revisit getting out of bed in the morning and break it right down. First, you roll onto your side, maybe press your hand into your mattress, flip your legs out, and sit up. The Turkish Get-Up is one way to train this. You roll to your shoulder, to your elbow then onto your wrist, working your way up using your core to help you complete the exercise from bottom to top, then top to bottom in a controlled manner. Now, your clients may only be able to perform the first three steps, and that is okay, as that is their starting point. As you teach, it is your job to not only help get them stronger, but to make that connection of the importance of the movement so they can see the benefit that lies beneath the exercise. The benefits of training KB with mobility allows you to have a solid strength and conditioning routine that builds fundamental movement patterns, enhancing the functionality of each set of moves and workout as you progress.

Basic Kettlebell Exercises for Functional Training

  1. Full Mobility Swing

The hip hinge should be trained! Learning how to properly train the posterior chain  will benefit a person’s daily movements.

How to train it:

  • Lean over the KB and grab it by the handle.
  • Push your hips back and pull your shoulders back.
  • Drive/swing the kettlebell back above and behind your knees.
  • Thrust your hips forward, squeeze your glutes, and stand up straight. Do not backward bend at the top of the motion! Be sure to create a non-stop fluid motion as you swing – with the KB going behind the knees, then up to shoulder level.
  • At the top of the swing, the KB should go no higher than chest level. Do not raise the KB with your arms. Your arms – as well as the KB – should remain weightless through the entire motion.

Note: The hinge remains a constant even though everyone swings a bit differently.

  1. Kettlebell Press (with and without rotational press)

Think about how many times you lift something overhead or reach with rotation.

How to train it:

  • From the rack position, squeeze the KB handle (the handle should lie across the hand with the lower part of the handle on the heel of the hand).
  • As the KB is pressed, the elbow rotates slightly out.
  • The forearm should remain vertical throughout the lift.
  • At the top, the arm should be fully extended.
  • The latissimus dorsi is engaged, the shoulder remains in the socket. If the latissimus  dorsi is engaged there should be a gap between the shoulder and the neck.
  • During the lift, the core is engaged and glutes are tight.
  • The feet grip the ground.
  • During the lowering portion of the lift, pull the KB down with tension back to the rack position.
  • Repeat on the other side, adding in rotation once ready to progress.
  1. Turkish Get Up 

Getting off the floor (or out of bed) we roll to the side, we use our hands to push up to standing.

How to train it:

  • Start by lying down with the KB in your right hand, right leg bent, left leg extended at a  45 degree angle.
  • Push yourself up to your left elbow.
  • Push yourself up to your left hand.
  • Lift your body up by pushing your hips up to the sky.
  • Swivel your left leg under your body and bend it so that you are now supported by your left knee, right foot and left hand.
  • Come to a kneeling position by pushing off your left hand.
  • Come to a standing position with the KB secure overhead in right hand.

Note: Your TGU is not complete until you go down the same way you came up!

  1. Kettlebell Squat

Think how many times you sit and stand. You should know the standard squat form first before adding weight or performing the different variations. In a standard squat there is your dominant level change, the knee bend.

How to train it:

  • Start with your legs slightly wider than hip width apart, push your hips back while keeping your chest up and shoulders back, as if you were going to sit in a chair.
  • Keep both heels on the ground as you ideally sit to where the line of your hips goes below your knees. Depending on flexibility, skill, and body mechanics, different people will go to various depths in their squat.
  • As you come up, push through your heels and keep your upper body in line with your lower legs, finishing at the top with your hips forward, squeezing your glutes and standing straight up, making sure not to over arch your back.
  • Add in the kettlebell when you can successfully perform a squat, hold it in a mid-rack position (bending at the elbows, holding elbows by your sides and grabbing the kettlebell by the horns).

I challenge you to be mindful of your motion today and consider how functional training can be beneficial.  We ultimately want to train for quality of life, and at the end of the day our goal is to move pain free by functionally training!

About Jodi Barrett

After 13 years of being a stay at home mom, Jodi Barrett found Kettlebell Kickboxing!  That journey took her to complete her KBIA-Master Level and MKC Certifications. Jodi teaches classes and certifies trainers across Canada. Connect with Jodi at kettlebellkickboxingcanada.com or on Instagram at @kettlebellkickboxingcanada

 

Movement of the Month: Flow from Home or Outdoors

By | Movement

By Coach Kennedy

July is here, summer is well on its way, and we are now some four plus months into our “new reality”, if you will, since COVID hit back in mid-March.

This month I wanted to once again offer up something that we could easily perform indoors as well as outdoors, and most importantly, benefit your fitness and health.

I’ll be performing a series of three movements, animal flow based, and then I’ll show you how to combine them for some really fun, effective, purposeful animal flows!  I’ll be performing:

  1. Static Beast
  2. Crab
  3. Side Kick through
  4. A flow combining all three movements.

The benefits of these movements and flow include functional strength, muscular endurance, stability, core strength, body awareness (proprioception), inter and intra muscular coordination, connects the right and left brain, nervous system activation, myofascial tone and last, but not least, it’s a ton of fun when you start to flow them together!

EXERCISE EXECUTION:

Due to the complexity of each movement and the flow in this section, I have provided complete videos for your ease of use and instruction.

Static Beast:

Crab:

Side Kick Through:

Flow combining 3 movements:

EXERCISE PROTOCOL:

Each movement can be used on its’ own for prepping or as part of the exercise program. You can perform 6-8 reps per side or use a timed approach, 10 to 30 seconds. Perform 1-4 sets depending on its intent.

ALWAYS regress and progress as required. Not sure how?  With this movement consider the following: coupling time, strength bands, advanced toners, weighted vests, unstable surfaces, and pause holds.  Need more help? Connect with me at: kennedy@coachkennedyonline.ca.

Catch more Coach Kennedy at the canfitpro 2020 Virtual Series!
Register now.

About Coach Kennedy

Coach Kennedy (Kennedy Lodato) is a 29-year advocate of health and a 14-year veteran of the fitness industry with a thirst for knowledge and a passion for teaching and running his own one on one coaching programs, consulting, live education, workshops and lectures. Coach Kennedy is also an educator for canfitpro and EBFA- the Evidence Based Fitness Academy (www.ebfafitness.com).

Before pursuing his true felt passion for mentoring trainers and coaches, he occupied the positions of Personal Trainer, Sport Conditioning Coach and Personal Trainer Manager.  Kennedy is a three-time recipient of the canfitpro PRO TRAINER of the year award as well as the 2019 Canadian Delegates Choice Presenter of the Year Award.  Coach Kennedy is also a cofounder of QHI- Quantum Health Institute.  www.KennedyLodato.com and www.quantumhealthcollective.com

 

A Safe Return to the Gym

By | Movement

By Claudiu Popa, PTS

For many, the prospect of returning to the gym is accompanied by mixed emotions. Aside from the obvious concerns over invisible viruses anxious to make us their next hosts, we now have to get used to exercising in a public setting all over again. Even people who have applied themselves to a light-to-moderate exercise regimen while waiting for gyms to reopen are finding it challenging to return to their previous routine. Here are my seven tips for a safe and successful re-acclimation.

  1. Don’t rush.
    Give yourself 4-6 workouts to get back into the groove. There’s no hurry. Chances are no one’s watching you anymore. People are distancing, minding their own business, and engaging in much shorter workout sessions. Take your time, but hurry up, as the saying goes.
  2. Expect a lower energy level.
    A lack of conditioning and a reduced audience will have an impact. Don’t force your first few workouts. Trust your muscles to recover, just not instantly. Give them a chance to remember.
  3. Safety above all.
    After taking germs and their respective countermeasures into consideration, you are your own biggest risk factor. Spend time warming up, don’t go back to huge weights, and avoid explosive exertion, at least for the first little while. Your joints and muscles will thank you.
  4. Muscles don’t forget, just give them time to remember.
    In addition to warming up, remember to reintroduce muscles to the equipment you will be using going forward. Strive for high reps as opposed to heavy lifts, at least during the first couple of workouts. Either way, you will see significant improvement from one workout to the next, provided you have not injured your tissues too much.
  5. Focus on a split routine.
    Avoid full body workouts and isolation exercises. Your safest options are compound movements that give muscles a chance to collaborate and ‘spot’ each other in ways that isolation exercises do not. Split your weekly exercises into thirds and try to gravitate towards one area, making the most of the equipment you have already disinfected.
  6. Leave some for later.
    Work on prioritizing exercises that require gym equipment over those that do not. This offers an opportunity to complete your workout later, perhaps with lighter weights, outside the gym. The combination of equipment vs natural resistance also serves to trigger muscle memory and begin the process of conditioning the tissues.
  7. Keep it simple.
    The new routine means that staff, trainers, and clients may be hyper vigilant and distracted for a while after gyms reopen. The dilution of focus on exercise not only reduces workout effectiveness, but increases the risk of injury. Remember to stick to simple exercises, trust that you have done everything to be safe in your immediate space, and focus on the exercise. The usual techniques of breathing, visualization, and proper contraction may initially feel awkward, but that’s only because of our distracted mind being concerned about external factors. Practice them during every set of every workout and your muscle memory will do the rest.

Different individuals are faced with the task of regaining previous levels of conditioning at different rates based on their age, health, and other factors. Proper rest and nutrition play key roles in the recovery process and must be adopted with the same discipline and rigor as the workouts themselves. A great way to do it is to keep a “Post-Pandemic Diary” and log all the important variables that can be easily measured, from daily calories to hours of sleep. It will not only help to maintain consistent effort while juggling many variables, but also serve as a great account of a gradual recovery to enjoy going back to and reviewing in the future – because sometimes even our muscle memory can use a bit of extra help.

About Claudiu Popa, PTS, OAS

Claudiu Popa, PTS, OAS, enjoys strength training and fitness conditioning, specializes in older adult fitness, appreciates working with exceptional clients and collaborating with outstanding professionals. Claudiu is the founder of Workout Smart and can be reached in confidence at Claudiu@WorkoutSmart.ca.  Be sure to follow him at twitter.com and on www.WorkoutSmart.ca.

Falling Into the Expertise Trap

By | Movement

By Justin Tamsett

When you’re an expert you can charge more. You have an unequivocal new level of professionalism. It can be associated with being a high performer. It can separate you from your competition. It can also lead to arrogance and a blinkered view that will be detrimental to your success as an expert. For true expertise, enjoy what Buddhists call ‘beginner’s mind.’

Let’s explore these five behaviours that will inhibit your success:

  1. Using jargon
  2. Blinkered vision
  3. Not looking for fresh ideas
  4. Losing your curiosity
  5. Reluctance to making/admitting mistakes

Using Jargon

You may have every qualification on a specific area of training and can explain cause and effect strategies, but your prospect or your client can not. While it will sound impressive using jargon, it can be confusing for your clients.

I have heard trainers explaining various training cycles, movement patterns, nutritional guidelines, and more to their clients. They are too busy espousing their knowledge to notice that their client’s eyes are glazing over.

The best experts are the ones who can take the most technical and scientific information and translate that into language that the average person can understand.  When we are explaining anything we must use the language that they would use. By using their language they will see that you care about them. As Theodore Roosevelt said, “Nobody cares how much you know, until they know how much you care.”

You Have Blinkered Vision

Every day around the world there are researchers working to find better ways for us to exercise and new information is shared for us to help our clients. Often, as an expert, we don’t read this material, we don’t acknowledge the new research, and we are not open to doing new things.

Often, as an expert, it is just easier to keep doing things the way we have always done them. We are comfortable. We know what we are doing. But we are blinkered and narrow-minded.

Challenge your assumptions. The best experts are the ones who are open to learning. They want to explore new ways of doing things. They want to give their clients the latest and the greatest training technique as that shows their clients they are continually researching to get better.

Your narrow mindedness will lead to over confidence and even arrogance. This is the beginning of the end for an expert. When you think you know everything, you have become like an apple that has fallen from the tree: ripe and rotting. Stay green and growing and you will be successful.

Look For Fresh Ideas

When you are an ‘expert’ you often become insular in your thinking. Harvard Business Review terms this as ‘intellectually cloistered.’  Your peers don’t, and sometimes can’t, challenge you as they used to because you know it all.

Some suggestions to always seek new ideas include:

  • Have a trusted circle of people who you value their thoughts and insights. This circle allows you to present ideas to for feedback, or ask questions to and then be open to their ideas.
  • Find new people in and out of the industry to become a source of ideas for you.
  • Develop a peer who also has a similar expertise and the two of you can support, learn, and grow together. It’s a hyper-connected world – this peer could be local or international.

Losing Curiosity

Curious means you really want to know something! It eats away at you and you have an unwavering focus to find out the secret sauce!  When you are curious, you ask loads of questions, explore more, and learn to a greater depth.

An expert can still be someone who asks questions. An expert can still be someone who is curious about the secret sauce. This curiosity strengthens you as an expert as you learn and look at many things from different perspectives. Curiosity is a powerful trait to maintain.

Reluctance to Making/Admitting Mistakes

None of us remember learning to walk and yet we are all now walking experts.  When we initially learned, we made many mistakes as we lost balance, fell, got up again, fell, got up again, and perhaps repeated this many times. This experimentation did not scar us for life; it helped us learn a new skill.

Often, when we consider ourselves an expert, we don’t experiment or try new things.  We even fail to admit making a mistake. We simply stop taking risks for fear of failure. For us to grow and get better, we must push limits and try, even if it means falling on our face as we did as child!

The real learning for most leaders comes from making mistakes. Outstanding leaders acknowledge a mistake and learn from it.  They identify actions that lead to that mistake or can clearly articulate the lessons learned. In fact, every month why not have an audit where you write down everything you have tried in the month. This number could be a new KPI for your business and personal development.

An area of expertise can be a differentiating factor. It can allow you to niche your service. There is, however, a huge cavern between being an expert and working in a niche. They are completely different and should not be confused. The best leaders may, or may not, work in a niche, but they are those who remain humble and hungry.  You can be an expert, just remain humble and hungry for knowledge, wisdom, and success.

About Justin Tamsett

Justin Tamsett is recognised as an International thought leader to get more people moving and moving more often. JT is a speaker; the star of a weekly Facebook Live show called #JTInTheRaw; owner of The Fitness Business Podcast; and the facilitator of the Active Management Community Facebook page.

The Power of Connections

By | Movement

Women Who Influence has grown to become one of the largest, most popular events at canfitpro and has sparked a movement within the fitness industry globally. This event is not only a chance to have fun while slipping on a dressy outfit; it’s also an opportunity to connect with industry leaders, build networks, celebrate SHEROs, be inspired by experts, and learn in an environment that empowers women to lead with passion and with purpose.

Despite the fact that we are living in disruptive and uncertain times, one thing remains true — there’s power in people connecting. This is why canfitpro is excited to bring the magic of its in-person canfitpro Women Who Influence event online as a dedicated track on Friday August 14, 2020 within the canfitpro 2020 Virtual Series.

It’s important that we continue to provide women with this opportunity to come together, especially to have a space where women can connect LIVE online until we can come back together in 2021. We will be encouraging women to embrace their SHERO-power and charisma in different ways during the event. A sneak peak into some of the fun includes getting glammed up, hair fascinator and all; something to celebrate one another by, while creating common bonds and shared connections.

Although physical-distancing is the order of the day, social-distancing will certainly not be. Sharing of selfies will be encouraged! And even more importantly, a few words or a statement to describe the experience will be welcomed from attendees. If interested, attendees will even have a chance to be featured in a spotlight article — to relive and celebrate in the afterglow of the canfitpro Women Who Influence event.

In the same vein, the overall theme for the canfitpro 2020 Virtual Series is “The Power of Connections” and to help kick off this inaugural series, canfitpro is featuring Mike Lipkin — one of Canada’s best-known Motivational Speakers. Mike will be speaking on “The Power of Connection — Creating Your Own Virtual Charisma”. Immediately following this keynote address the canfitpro Women Who Influence track will kick off with a morning educational session “The Perfection Detox” with Petra Kolber, an afternoon educational session “The Tallest Poppy” with Dr. Rumeet Billan, along with a mid-day workout. The closing session of the day will be a special “The Power of Women” Panel hosted by Mo Hagan — creator of Women Who Influence — and will feature 3 powerful women of influence.

For a mid-day energy boost, join Canadian Duo & Celebrity Dance Artists Luka & Jenalyn from JLo’s hit NBC TV show “NBC’s World Of Dance” for a fun-filled fitness based dance class based on Jenalyn’s philosophy that has guided her successful dance career. Live-streaming will be available on canfitpro Facebook and Instagram accounts and is open to all, with a request for a donation of your choice to Unsinkable — a charity who’s mission is to keep youth invested in emotional and physical well being despite the obstacles they face, so invite your friends!

Now more than ever, strength and resilience paired with passion and
purpose are so important, along with a dose of perfection detox, that will help bring you through 2020. So be sure to give yourself this time to fill your cup, get inspired and make meaningful connections, all from the safety and comfort of your own home. Find out more about canfitpro’s Women Who Influence and canfitpro 2020 Virtual Series at canfitpro2020.org and register today!

Movement of the Month: Single Leg Bounds With Perturbations

By | Movement

By Coach Kennedy

Reality is a strange thing, is it not?  One day we’re living with all of the freedoms the world has to offer and the next minute we’re at the mercy of a virus, COVID-19.  The entire WORLD.  It’s hard to ever have imagined it in this day and age.  Many have suffered discomfort and pain (both financially and mentally) so it’s especially nice to see how so many have come together to offer support in our industry. I’ve seen free classes, support groups, webinars, Instagram and Facebook Live and the list goes on!  From our trainers in the trenches to the CEO’s at the helm of corporations (and everyone in-between) I am proud to say that I am part of this industry.

So regardless of where you find yourself when you’re reading this, know that you are responsible for making this industry what it is!  Loving, giving, caring, supportive, non-judgemental and always with open arms.  Without you we wouldn’t have a leg to stand on!  Which leads me into our movement of the month.  Single Leg Bounds with Perturbations.

Single leg bounds with perturbations is a fun, functional movement that’s easy to adapt to any fitness level and can be done indoors at home, outdoors in the park or at your local training facility. It offers many benefits, two of which are balance and stability. Both of which are key in injury prevention and force production. (If you’re not familiar with the term perturbations, they’re simply disturbances to your prime movers. If that still doesn’t makes sense, the video will show and explain it.)

But it doesn’t stop there because it’s all about perception.  What’s perception have to do with it?  Some might see a fun, functional balance exercise and if that’s it, that’s perfectly fine.  The ends justifies the means… even if at times we don’t realize all of the benefits.  Meaning that the benefits of this movement are beneficial to anyone so long as you’ve decided that through some sort of an assessment.  As far as perception… this exercise also offers the benefits of sequential muscle firing, acceleration, deceleration, power, strength and even muscular endurance! So as you can see it’s full packed of benefits.

EXERCISE EXECUTION: STEP #1: Begin in your atheltic stance: feet shoulder width apart, knees slightly bent, hips flexed while maintaining a long spine with head looking forward and your arms bent at the elbows at about ninety degrees.

STEP #2: Now begin to extend the right arm back while simultaneously flexing the left am forward while still maintain elbows at about ninety degrees and with thrust push off the left leg and land on your right single leg while your arms now change position. Your end position now should be right single leg, right arm forward, left leg off the ground and left arm back. See the attached video for a complete and visual explanation.

EXERCISE PROTOCOL: Rep Range: 3 to 8 reps per side depending on your goal outcome.

ALWAYS regress and progress as required. Not sure how?  With this movement consider the following: coupling time, strength bands, advanced toners, weighted vests, unstable surfaces and pause holds.  Need more help? Connect with me at: kennedy@coachkennedyonline.ca.

About Coach Kennedy

Coach Kennedy (Kennedy Lodato) is a 29-year advocate of health and a 14-year veteran of the fitness industry with a thirst for knowledge and a passion for teaching and running his own one on one coaching programs, consulting, live education, workshops and lectures. Coach Kennedy is also an educator for canfitpro and EBFA- the Evidence Based Fitness Academy (www.ebfafitness.com).

Before pursuing his true felt passion for mentoring trainers and coaches, he occupied the positions of Personal Trainer, Sport Conditioning Coach and Personal Trainer Manager.  Kennedy is a three-time recipient of the canfitpro PRO TRAINER of the year award as well as the 2019 Canadian Delegates Choice Presenter of the Year Award.  Coach Kennedy is also a cofounder of QHI- Quantum Health Institute.  www.KennedyLodato.com and www.quantumhealthcollective.com

 

Movement of the Month: Loaded Lateral Bound Single Leg Ice Skaters with Pause

By | Movement

By Coach Kennedy

I’ll be the first to say it. I’m EXTREMELY happy to be so, so close to summer! Now, that does not mean I let winter be an excuse for anything at all, no. No winter blues here, that’s just something we manifest in our own minds. It simply means that I realize that winter is part of life in Canada so I’ll learn to work with it, and I do. For me it’s a great time to catch up on certain things that otherwise would not be as much fun during the warmer months.

Welcome back to MOM as I like to call it, or as you all know it, Movement of the Month. Before I get into our MOM I’d like to quickly let everyone know that I am 100% open to any suggestions on exercise, movements, ideas etc..for MOM, please feel free to email me at: kennedy@coachkennedyonline.ca

In last’s month edition of movement of the month I spoke about fixed positions and their affects on the human movement system. This month I want to talk to you about a concept called Loaded Movement Training. If the terminology is knew to you it simply means multiplanar, multidirectional movement. Full body integration from your feet to your finger tips and from the inside out, as in from your core.

The concept to me has always been there but I first came across the term Loaded Movement Training (LMT) at a mentorship in San Diego held by the creator of the ViPR PRO ( which happens to be the tool I’ll be using in this months MOM) a number of years ago. Which leads me into this months movement of the month, Loaded Lateral Bound Single Leg  Ice Skaters with Pause.

The Loaded Lateral Bound Single Leg Ice Skaters with Pause are great for your core, endurance, balance, stability, mobility and reaction time all rolled into one! As I mentioned it integrates the entire kinetic chain, toes to finger tips, always involves your core just simply due to the nature of how the tool is held and where it stands in relation to you body. It’s great for fascia health because of its flowing and integrated movement style, great for your feet because of the demand put on them and last but not least, this is the sort of movement that’s required…you guessed it, in everyday life and in sport.

Exercise Execution:

While I could try and run through a complete description here, this particular movement is best watched live.

Exercise Protocol:

Perform with TIME. Begin at 15 secs and move up depending on goal and the weight of the tool being administered.

ALWAYS regress and progress as required. Not sure how? Email me at kennedy@coachkennedyonline.ca.

About Coach Kennedy

Coach Kennedy (Kennedy Lodato) is a 29-year advocate of health and a 14-year veteran of the fitness industry with a thirst for knowledge and a passion for teaching and running his own mentorships, live education, workshops, and lectures. He is also an educator for canfitpro and EBFA- the Evidence Based Fitness Academy (ebfafitness.com).

Before pursuing his true felt passion for mentoring trainers and coaches, he occupied the positions of Personal Trainer, Sport Conditioning Coach, and Personal Training Manager. Kennedy is a three-time recipient of the canfitpro PRO TRAINER of the year award as well as the 2019 Canadian Delegates’ Choice Presenter of the Year Award. Coach Kennedy is also a cofounder of QHI- Quantum Health Institute.  www.KennedyLodato.com and www.quantumhealthcollective.com

Strength Training for the Pregnant Athlete With Tracie Smith-Beyak

By | Movement

Exercise during pregnancy is generally good for both the mother and baby. In this episode, Tracie Smith-Beyak discusses the specifics of strength training during pregnancy. This includes both risks and benefits associated with working out.

Interested to learn more about training pregnant as well as pre- and post-natal clients? Take our online course Understanding a Fit Pregnancy with Tracie Smith-Beyak who is one of the authors.

IN THIS EPISODE

1:30 - Is it safe to strength train using moderate to heavy loads during pregnancy? Especially if the client was lifting prior to getting pregnant?

3:00 - General load guidelines for strength training

4:00 - Risks associated with strength training during pregnancy

7:30 - Benefits associated with strength training during pregnancy

9:00 - Tips for prenatal athletic weight training

About Tracie-Smith Beyak

Tracie Smith-Beyak is a master trainer, presenter, author, and a member of the canfitpro Fitness Advisory Panel. Specializing in prenatal fitness, biomechanics, rehab and athletics, she has made regular appearances in fitness, medical, and business industries for over 23 years. Tracie is a contributing author for canfitpro's online education course, Understanding A Fit Pregnancy. Her awards include; The Women in Business Award 2015, The Readers Choice Personal Trainer Medal 2016, Entrepreneur of the Year 2008, and the Best of the Best in Personal Training 2015. Tracie has been in the fitness industry for over 35 years training, teaching, and certifying trainers and instructors worldwide.

Movement of the Month: Single Leg Reach Forward Assisted Squat

By | Movement

By Coach Kennedy

Last month I spoke about how our daily fixed positions of standing, sitting, using computers and electronic devices, to name a few, can reek havoc on our thoracic spine and shoulders. All of which have shown to lead to decreased levels of performance and increased risk of injury. Now, what I didn’t get into was how those same positions can also reek havoc on the lower body – feet, knees, and hips for example.

Those same positions can cause the feet to evert (fall inward), abduct (turn outward), have your knees cave in, create excessive internal rotation of the shins and femurs, creating an anterior pelvic tilt, low back discomfort, pain, and even injury. Muscular wise, consider this: feet falling inward – “weak” anterior tibialis; shins and femurs internally rotating, hips falling forward – more than likely “tight” TFL’s, among others, and of course “weak” glutes.

So the question becomes, what can we do? For starters, PLEASE don’t assume, do your screening and assessments then, and only then, if your assessments see the need for this movement, use it. Otherwise simply use it as an exercise in your regular programming.

The Single Leg Reach Forward Assissted Squat (shout out to Jason Persaud)

This is a great movement that can be used in your workout routine, as an activation, and/or corrective exercise. Benefits include: single leg balance strength, intramuscular and intermuscular coordination – it won’t take much to see how this integrates from your big toe right up to your TFL and glutes, nervous system activation, and if fascia is your talk, think about the spiral, lateral, and deep front lines. Visualize anterior tibialis, right up the IT band and then into the TFL and Gluteus Medius.

Exercise Execution:

  • Begin by setting your body up with your heel raised on a proper platform and make sure the same side leg is also where you are supporting your hand for stability
  • Begin your downward phase of the squat and be sure to maintain knee tracking over the second metatarsal
  • Look forward and maintain a long spine
  • Focus on reaching forward with the opposite leg, letting the hips and knees flex and come along for the ride
  • Maintain a slow and controlled tempo – feel and make the connection.

Exercise Protocol:

Repetition Range: six to 12 repetitions per side, depending on your goal outcome.

ALWAYS regress and progress as required. Not sure how?  Get me at: kennedy@coachkennedyonline.ca.

About Coach Kennedy

Coach Kennedy (Kennedy Lodato) is a 29-year advocate of health and a 14-year veteran of the fitness industry with a thirst for knowledge and a passion for teaching and running his own mentorships, live education, workshops, and lectures. He is also an educator for canfitpro and EBFA- the Evidence Based Fitness Academy (ebfafitness.com).

Before pursuing his true felt passion for mentoring trainers and coaches, he occupied the positions of Personal Trainer, Sport Conditioning Coach, and Personal Training Manager. Kennedy is a three-time recipient of the canfitpro PRO TRAINER of the year award as well as the 2019 Canadian Delegates’ Choice Presenter of the Year Award. Coach Kennedy is also a cofounder of QHI- Quantum Health Institute.  www.KennedyLodato.com and www.quantumhealthcollective.com

 

Foam Roller Training Ideas

By | Movement

By Kathleen Trotter, PTS

Think outside a warm-up or cool down and get your clients using this versatile tool throughout their workouts.

About Kathleen Trotter

Kathleen Trotter holds a masters in Exercise Science, is the author of two books including the new book Your Fittest Future Self, and is a Personal trainer, Nutritionist, Pilates Specialist and Life Coach. Visit her at KathleenTrotter.com

Twitter: @FITbyKathleenT

Instagram: @fitbykathleent

Facebook:  FIT by Kathleen Trotter